Suspended Nerves

14 February 2012 1 comment

The organization of the body is amazing! Each muscle and ligament has an attachment to another structure and therefore is influenced by or can influence the structure. Everything is tied together and is dependent that each part functions correctly.

I think of a suspension bridge like the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. The road is being suspended by hangers which are themselves suspended by cables. The cables run the length of the bridge and from tower to tower. Each tower provides an anchoring point for the cables but also the rigid structure from which the rest of the bridge can “suspend”. Imagine if one of those towers could pivot. The cables would pull taught or let loose depending on the direction of the pivot. That would cause the road to pull up on the side of increased tension and let down on the opposite. Thus the towers influence the function or dysfunction of the bridge.

There was a study done on where the origin and attachment sites are on each of the cervical nerves. I find it interesting that there are four ligaments that “suspend” each nerve as it passes though the IVF. Each of these ligaments have their own different attachment site and different movements will pull or let loose part of the spinal nerve and therefore cause temporary deformation or obstruction of the nerve. This is normal and the body can tolerate this temporary distortion well. The problem arises when there are chronic mal-positions of these nerves due to misaligned vertebra.

As upper cervical doctors, we have a special interest in the Occipital-Atlas-Axis complex. The article talks about the how the C2 spinal nerve is attached to the transverse process of Atlas. We have seen some wicked rotation films of Atlas, some exceeding 7-8 degrees. I can’t help but wonder how the tension of that ligament is affecting that spinal nerve, not to mention the spinal cord as a whole.

I am so grateful that the knowledge is available so we all can benefit from reducing the subluxation and restore the full functioning potential of the miracle that is our body.

Check out the article for your own enjoyment.

Advertisements

Patient Satisfaction To Upper Cervical Chiropractic Treatment

9 January 2012 5 comments

A study was published by Kirk Eriksen, Rodric Rochester, and Eric Hurwitz in October of 2011 that evaluated patient response to upper cervical chiropractic treatments. This is a unique study as it does not include all chiropractic therapies, but just those that are considered upper cervical specific. What is the difference between the chiropractic therapies? Glad you asked, check out the “About Chiropractic” side menu to learn more.

Read the article for full details but here’s a rundown of things I found interesting:

  • 1090 patients and 83 doctors participated in this study.
  • 28 different chief complaints were represented.
  • It was common to see a worsening of chief complaint initially.
  • Most patients found their undesirable reaction to be mild and last less than 24 hours.
  • The study found that of all the patients that had experienced a systematic reaction other than chief complaint, tiredness was the most common.
  • Patients gave a golden 9.1/10 for overall satisfaction for the care received.
  • A 57% average improvement of low back pain. Interestingly only the neck was adjusted.
  • Over 5 million combined career adjustments were reported by the 83 participating doctors without any serious adverse reaction.

It is typical to experience some undesired reactions such as muscle soreness and weakness or headache, this is only temporarily and in most cases subsides within 24 hours while improving your overall health. Compare that to the medication commercials that list endless side effects, many of them worst than your existing condition. This entertaining “label” could be applied when visiting your upper cervical doctor:

The mean of  9.1/10 satisfaction rating observed in this study is incredible! This is significant in that a 0-10 scale was used to quantify level of satisfaction not just a “yes/no” reply or similar grading system. Combine this with most patients undergoing short term, mild discomfort and an estimated 5 million career adjustments of the participating 83 doctors without any serious adverse reaction, you have yourself a remarkably safe and effective system to treat patients of varying conditions. Upper cervical practitioners are already familiar with this safe and satisfying procedure of care, but the well written study by Erikson et al. illustrates and quantifies how patients perceive the efficacious treatment provided.

Related studies that are not upper cervical specific only:

%d bloggers like this: